Letting Go and Taking Away

 

Some people say that if there is a piece of rock on our mind, we must remove it. Otherwise, it becomes too much of a burden. Or, if there is a piece of rock on the road we are on, we also have to remove it so we can go on. If there is a rock in the yard, we have to put it in the right spot for it to look good.

 

What are the rocks in our mind? Distress, worries, sorrow, hatred, depression, and anxiety are worse than carrying a rock in our mind, especially when we are frustrated for being wronged. A particular person or a certain matter can also be such a rock. Even money, properties, or possessions can become rocks in our mind. If we do not let go of these rocks, they become our burden, and life will be difficult.

 

When we think about it, we are all really quite strong in carrying tons of worries in our mind! In addition, there are human relations, finances, and the stress of daily life. We have to deal with right and wrong, self and others, gain and loss, good and bad all the time. They just keep piling high in our mind. No wonder people nowadays are learning to get rid of their stress and to let go of that piece of rock in their mind.

 

Unfortunately, rocks are not easy to let go of. The pile of rocks in front of us is even harder to remove. What are the rocks in front of us? They can be a government policy, a group plan, others’ disapproval, a different opinion, or in worse cases, endless blame, criticisms, warnings, and slander? These are the rocks most difficult to get rid of.

 

It takes our own effort to unload these rocks whether they are inside or outside because it is impossible to count on others to do the job. What others can offer are usually advice, consolation, and encouragement for the moment. By either letting go or taking away, we must understand that “The one who can untie the bell is the one tying it in the first place.” The best way to do it is to learn the Dharma. We can remove the rocks with morals, concentration, and wisdom or break them up by practicing the Noble Eightfold Path. If we are dealing with rocks outside our mind, we can apply wisdom, compassion, and relationships with others to change their nature. When these rocks are changed as such, they will no longer be rocks!

 

The Buddha taught us, “Let go, and be carefree.” By being able to view the five components of our existence as empty, we will naturally be able to liberate ourselves from all suffering and be carefree!